"Writing as well as directing, Turk throws a plethora of other obstacles in Armin’s twisty path, including broken-down cars, lost phones, school meetings, missed obstetrician appointments with his pregnant wife (Maja Zećo) and a bordering-on-desperate lack of finances. Still, the onslaught of dispiriting incidents is never repetitive, outlandish or over-played, to the filmmaker’s considerable credit. There’s a rhythm to the narrative that reflects that of reality, albeit with more downs than ups. That daily life is filled with continual disappointment might not prove the cheeriest message, but it’s never packaged as a statement of grim condemnation either; rather, the film posits that the struggle is worth enduring for the sake of love and family." Screendaily

“What Good Day’s Work does very well is getting the audience involved, challenging viewers to ask themselves what they would do in Armin’s shoes. From the safety of the movie theatre, it is easy to judge him, tutting at some of his decisions, but Seksan’s charisma brings Armin closer to the audience: he is more a friend who is down on his luck than someone whose actions are to be judged coldly. Some of the subplots also aid in creating an attractive map for Armin to get lost in.”

“There is a palpable lack of films that deal with everyday life and everyman in Sarajevo without including the war and/or its consequences. Even with the international team behind it, Good Day’s Work makes for a solid film that represents the city and its people and their struggles well. On top of that, given the short time and the micro budget that it took to make this film, Good Day’s Work deserves a lot of praise and is definitely worth the watch.”
Back to Top